Quantcast
Back to news
14 Nov 2017 | News

Collaboration Strengthens Climate Resiliency of Upper Gojal Gilgit Mountain Villages in The Upper Indus Basin

As climate change impacts are increasing the likelihood of natural disasters, such as floods and landslides, having a thorough disaster risk management plan is become more important for communities throughout the Hindu Kush Himalaya (HKH). The government of Gilgit Baltistan in Pakistan has recognized the efforts of the Indus Basin Initiative of the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) and consortium partners to establish more resilient mountain villages through partnership with the Gilgit Baltistan Disaster Management Authority (GB-DMA). As part of this effort ICIMOD built the institutional capacity of GB-DMA to enable the transition from a response-based approach to a proactive one by updating the Gilgit Baltistan Disaster Risk Management Plan.

1 min Read

70% Complete
Building climate resiliency in Gilgit mountain villages: hazard management and irrigation systems; biological engineering and bio-briquettes to protect croplands; and high-value orchards.

Carried out in coordination with partners including WWF-Pakistan and Agha Khan Agency for Habitat (AKAH), these efforts have strengthened service providers and helped communities adapt to climate change through:

Gilgit-Baltistan is home of the Hindu Kush, Himalaya and Karakorum mountain ranges. The region is combating climatic variations that lead to disasters like avalanches, glacial lake outburst floods and torrential monsoon rains. All of these disasters trigger socio-economic changes in the communities they affect, further aggravating community livelihood options in areas with already limited agricultural opportunities. Other partners include the Pakistan Council of Research in Water Resources, Karakorum International University, Forest Department GB, and Pakistan Agricultural Research Council.

This initiative is part of ICIMOD’s River Basins Programme, Indus Basin Initiative. The transboundary Indus basin, with an area size of 1.1 million sq.km, is spread across Afghanistan, China, India (33%), and Pakistan (52%) with the upper portion resting in the Hindu Kush, Karakorum, and Himalayan ranges. The basin ranks among the most important in the world in terms of human dependence, supporting about 215 million people directly or indirectly. The upper part of the basin is the main source of water for agriculture, energy production, industrial use, and human consumption for the entire basin.

Stay current

Stay up to date on what’s happening around the HKH with our most recent publications and find out how you can help by subscribing to our mailing list.

related content

Continue exploring this topic

31 Aug 2017 News
ICIMOD and UCAS Symposium on Resilience in the HKH at International Congress of Ecology

Eklabya Sharma, the Deputy Director General of ICIMOD, delivered a keynote speech at the conference. Sharma talked about the importance ...

22 May 2019 News
Regional cooperation for tourism development: High-level dialogue on promoting India–Nepal cross-border tourism, trade, and industry

Cross-border tourism and regional cooperation are priority areas of the KLCDI – part of its overarching goal to further landscape-level ...

30 Oct 2018 News
Collaborative research on the Ponkar Glacier with Kathmandu University

The team conducted measurements at the lower parts of the glacier to quantify ice melt amount under debris layers and ...

6 Apr 2016 News
Anchoring Transboundary Cooperation: Vegetation and Land Use Type Map of Kailash Sacred Landscape

Kailash sacred landscape covers more than 31,000 km2 geographical area and is spread across China, India, and Nepal. It exhibits ...