Back to solutions
1 Jan 2020 | NEPCAT technologies

Improved compost preparation

1 min Read

70% Complete

Improved compost preparation using a range of biomass and waste to produce high value fertiliser

Compost can be prepared from a wide range of organic materials including dead plant material such as crop residues, weeds, forest litter, and kitchen waste. Compost making is an efficient way of converting all kinds of biomass into high value fertiliser that serves as a good alternative to farmyard manure, especially for crop-growing households without livestock. The compost is often mixed with forest soil, ripe compost from the previous batch, or even a small amount of animal dung as a starter for the decomposition process. The mix of materials determines the quality of the final compost as much as the management of the composting process. Nitrogen-rich fresh materials such as legume residues and many types of weeds and shrubs are mixed with carbon-rich forest litter and cereal residues. Small amounts of wood ash, lime, or mineral fertiliser can help increase or balance the overall nutrient content of the compost.

The compost needs to be turned every 30-50 days depending on the mix and the outside temperature. It should be protected from direct sunlight, rainfall and runoff so as to reduce volatilisation and leaching of nutrients. The material must remain moist at all times to avoid slowing down decomposition and hindering the efficiency of the micro and macro-organisms involved in decomposition. Heaping the compost or collecting the material in a pit helps the compost to reach the temperatures needed (700C) to destroy pests and weeds.

dark green: previous working districts;
light green: districts in 2007

WOCAT database reference: QT NEP7

Location: Nepal midhills

SWC measure: Management

Land use: Annual cropping on rainfed agricultural land

Climate: Humid subtropical

Related approach: Farmer- to-farmer diffusion (QA NEP1); Farmer-led experimentation (QA NEP3); Farmer field school on integrated plant nutrient systems (QA NEP4)

Compiled by: SSMP

Date: January 2007

Download PDF

1 Jan 2020 NEPCAT technologies
Contour bunding

A traditional low-cost method of soil conservation suitable for sloping land; it promotes water retention and helps prevent erosion. Contour bunding ...

1 Jan 2020 NEPCAT technologies
Cultivation of fodder and grasses

Cultivation of fodder crops on marginal lands and terrace risers Fodder plays a major role in the crop-livestock-manure-soil nutrient cycle on ...

2 Jan 2020 NEPCAT technologies
Polypit nursery

A simple, inexpensive and practical method for raising healthy plant seedlings During the winter in Nepal’s middle mountains, the soil temperature ...

2 Jan 2020 NEPCAT technologies
Traditional irrigated rice terraces

Level bench terraces with risers protected by fodder grasses, used for the irrigated production of rice, potatoes and wheat The level ...

1 Jan 2020 NEPCAT technologies
Improved cattleshed for urine collection

Collection of cattle urine in improved cattle sheds for use as liquid manure and organic pesticide Nitrogen is the most important ...

1 Jan 2020 NEPCAT technologies
Low cost micro-sprinkler irrigation

An irrigation system that delivers small-sized water droplets through a rotating head allowing longer watering time with less runoff Micro-sprinkler irrigation ...

1 Jan 2020 NEPCAT technologies
No-till garlic cultivation

No-till is a farming system in which the seeds are planted directly into untilled soil which still contains the previous ...

1 Jan 2020 NEPCAT technologies
Drinking water quality improvement through conservation measures

Structural and vegetative measures to improve the quality of drinking water contaminated due to poor sanitation and seepage This technology combines ...