Quantcast
Back to news
3 Oct 2016 | Blog

Researchers collaborate for studying the effects of climate change in the HKH region

Santosh Nepal & Arthur Lutz

0 mins Read

70% Complete
The team photographed at Future Water office (left to right: Sonu Khanal, Arthur Lutz, Wilco Terink, Walter Immerzeel, and Santosh Nepal

The changes happening in Himalayan Rivers has been widely discussed in last decades which ranges from single catchment to large river basins. These river basins are dependent on snow and glacier melt which has been largely used for agriculture, hydropower, household and industries. Providing water and other important ecosystem services to millions that reside in the upstream and downstream regions of these basins, the importance of understanding long-term climate impact on these basins is crucial. Specifically, the impact on water resources in form of water quality and quantity requires large scale hydrological modelling of these river systems. This in turn provides information on not only the hydrological characteristic of these basins, but provides for sectoral water management also such as irrigation and hydropower in the downstream regions.

READ MORE…

Stay current

Stay up to date on what’s happening around the HKH with our most recent publications and find out how you can help by subscribing to our mailing list.

Related Content

Continue exploring this topic

8 Mar 2017 RMS
Kalchebesi’s Real Entrepreneurs: Women Spearheading Adaptation to Climate Change

Many experts and researches have claimed that women suffer the impacts of climate change more than men do. This is ...

16 Apr 2019 Blog
Women: the hidden face of effective emissions mitigation?

Women as researchers as well as the vital subject Household-level combustion accounts for a significant percentage of air pollution ...

20 Jun 2018 Blog
Hidden Contributors in Kilns Perspective from Dhading District

The number of brick kilns is burgeoning in Nepal: even from ICIMOD’s rooftop you can see chimneys smoking away in ...

14 Mar 2017 Blog
Mountain women as agents of change

“At first I was afraid about having to come here by myself. But now I am happy with my decision. ...