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What’s funny about air pollution? It turns out there’s a lot to laugh about – and a lot to learn – when a popular comedic duo joins forces with scientists to create a telefilm on the issue.

18 Oct. 2015 at 8:50 pm in Nepal Television

‘Dhuwa’, a short telefilm about air pollution resulting from open fires premiered on 1 October 2015 at Kumari Hall in Kathmandu. Dhuwa, meaning smoke, was also telecast on Nepal Television on 18 October 2015...

Outreach

The impact of ICIMOD’s work in 2015 is visible in its ability to work with its member countries to respond to the urgent needs of mountain communities, from investigating a glacial lake outburst flood in Bhutan to quickly responding to the

Air pollution and the problems associated with it have gained the attention of people in the Hindu Kush Himalaya and the world at large. As more studies reveal the linkages between air pollution and human health, more people have started paying

The impact of ICIMOD’s work in 2015 is visible in its ability to work with its member countries to respond to the urgent needs of mountain communities, from investigating a glacial lake outburst flood in Bhutan to quickly responding to the

When water levels rise in flood-prone rivers, villagers are increasingly able to react quickly enough to save lives and livelihoods – whether they live in Assam, India, or the Koshi River basin of Nepal, or, in the latest upscaling of a successful

What do butterflies, rising rivers, unstable mountainsides, and the Sherpas of the Everest region have in common? All were the focus of new knowledge tools and applications honoured in 2015 with ICIMOD’s ICT for Mountain Development Award, which

Two transboundary initiatives in the eastern Himalayas moved ahead in 2015 with milestones that included pilot projects and the endorsement and implementation of regional cooperation frameworks (RCFs).

ICIMOD has developed significant expertise on wetlands in the Hindu Kush Himalayas over the course of a number of research projects and pilots on wetlands resources, including knowledge on improved management of wetland resources.

A vast amount of data about the Koshi River Basin is now at your fingertips, even in the field from a mobile phone. It has long been a challenge for users working on transboundary issues to find reliable data that doesn’t stop at borders, which

It’s often thought that migration remittances can boost a community’s resilience to disaster. But would that prove to be the case after the 2015 earthquake, or would the lack of youth to help with rescue and reconstruction mean that, in

Mountains offer ideal conditions for hydropower, but uneven distribution of benefits can lead to friction between communities and project developers. ICIMOD set out to learn what works and doesn’t work by undertaking the first comprehensive

The SERVIR-Himalaya Small Grants Programme has spurred innovative ways to help decision makers do everything, from expanding banana production to monitoring forest biomass from the sky.

If energy and water are subsidized to boost crop production, could it lead to more and cheaper food but a shrinking, degraded water supply? Growing crops for biofuels might promise more abundant, cleaner energy, but what happens to food security

A special issue of the International Journal of Water Resources Development was devoted in 2015 to sharing the research of ICIMOD experts on a range of Himalayan water-related challenges from the status of glaciers to socioeconomic and policy

The success of efforts to protect transboundary ecosystems relies in part on building bridges of friendship and cooperation between neighbouring countries and people. Building those connections within the Karakoram-Pamir Landscape was the goal of a

A field team was soon on its way, an example of the quick response to the needs of its regional member countries that ICIMOD is poised to provide. The scientific team, put together by the SERVIR-Himalaya Initiative and Cryosphere Monitoring

When parasitic mushroom spores infect the larvae of ghost moths living in Himalayan soil, a thin fingerlike fungus bursts from the head of the dead caterpillar and sets off an annual gold rush in mountain communities.