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Sixteen Nepalese specialists in ornithology, herpetofauna, biodiversity, plants and taxono-my, fisheries, and water and environment governance participated in the workshop. Ten technical papers focusing on various aspects of ecology and its relation

Increasing precipitation and glacier melt keep Asia’s rivers flowing

New Studies: Indus River flow variability and trends

The Koshi River basin is a transboundary basin shared by China, India, and Nepal. The River originates on the high altitude Tibetan Plateau and passes through eastern Nepal and northern Bihar in India before joining the Ganges.

The scars over the hills of Jure village in Sindupalchok district, nearly 40 kms south of the Nepal’s capital Kathmandu, still remain visible as constant reminder of the devastating landslide on 2 August 2014. The disaster killed 145 people

sites along the Ratu River in early August 2016 to check on instruments and document community experience with

After three years of initial research conducted in partnership with the Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research (BCCR), FutureWater, and several regional institutions, ICIMOD has been produced path-breaking research findings, which have not only been

ICIMOD, in collaboration with Gilgit Baltistan Disaster Management Authority and Focus Humanitarian Assistance, is planning to pilot Community Based Flood Early Warning System (CBFEWS) in Gilgit Baltistan under the project ‘Agricultural Water,

Two side events were organised by the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) in collaboration with Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research (IGSNRR) during the 33rd International Geographical

Indus River Basin is shared by four countries Afghanistan, China, India, and Pakistan, with the largest portions of the basin lying in Pakistan (52%) and India (33%). The main River originates at Lake Ngangla Rinco on the Tibetan Plateau in the

Lessons from the Barahchhetra community in the Koshi River Basin of Nepal

in the part of the Koshi River Basin shared by Nepal and China. The field visit was followed by a two-day KBP Partners’ Forum. The purpose of the visit was to

Methodology and progress review workshop: Land use and land cover change, Erosion and Sedimentation assessment over the Koshi River basin

by the International RiverFoundation, the 19th International Riversymposium (http://Riversymposium.com/), which is being held at Taj Palace in New Delhi, India from 12 to 14 September 2016, brings together River managers, policy developers,

in five of the major river basins in the region: the Indus, Brahmaputra, Ganges, Salween and

Partnership forum to reduce disasters in the Koshi River Basin

The Hindu Kush Himalaya (HKH) is one of the most dynamic, diverse, and complex mountain systems in the world, providing fresh water resources to more than 210 million people in the mountains and 1.3 billion people downstream.

Nepal is going through a phase of economic development, and consequently, a lot of water resources projects are being planned and constructed. Unfortunately, the country still takes the conventional project-by-project approach to development, which

By the mid-monsoon, flash floods of Bhote Koshi had already swept away more than 65 houses and placed 200 more at risk. With rains becoming heavier, further damage was expected.

A community-based flood early warning system (CB-FEWS) is an integrated system of tools and plans to detect and respond to flood emergencies. It’s managed by the communities themselves and, if properly designed and implemented, can make the