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Countries in the Himalayan and downstream areas of the Hindu Kush Himalayas need to strengthen their collaboration to address food, water and energy issues. Unless this happens, the region’s agricultural development could be at risk.

he Indus Basin is a key resource shared by Afghanistan, China, India, and Pakistan. Rising in the Tibetan Plateau in China and fed by tributaries from the Hindu Kush, Karakoram, and Himalayan ranges, some 300 million people live within the basin

most agriculturally abundant regions of Bihar (India) and Nepal that frequently suffers from significant flood and drought events attributing to low agricultural productivity,

Boru Douthwaite is a PhD in Agriculture (Technology Policy Analysis). He is an independent researcher and evaluator interested in understanding how research outputs and processes can be used to catalyse and bolster rural innovations.

Monday 21 March 2016 | ICIMOD Headquarters, Khumaltar, Lalitpur | 3:00-4:30 pm. This event is free and open to the public.

the Himalayan and downstream region strengthen collaboration to address food, water and energy issues, the region is likely to face an unprecedented food crisis. This was the underlining message of the two-day regionalKnowledge

Knowledge Forum with Dr Rajendra Pachauri: Climate Change in the Himalayan Region and the Way Forward

The adverse impacts of environmental shocks and stressors will be disproportionately high in developing countries, especially among the poor and vulnerable populations. People will respond to these impacts with a combination of in-situ and ex-situ

Knowledge Forum with Prof V. Ramanathan: The Extreme Vulnerability of the Himalayan-Tibetan Region to Global Warming and Air Pollution

Indus Forum, a World Bank funded project, is working to identify specific research and data gaps by mapping existing knowledge related to climate change in the Indus basin, and by supporting evidence based development in communities across the

Indus Forum, a World Bank funded project, is working to identify specific research and data gaps by mapping existing knowledge related to climate change in the Indus basin, and by supporting evidence based development in communities across the

The Koshi River basin is a transboundary basin shared by China, India, and Nepal. The river originates on the high altitude Tibetan Plateau and passes through eastern Nepal and northern Bihar in India before joining the Ganges.

Two-hundred and forty scientists from 26 countries came to Kathmandu in March to share the latest findings on glaciers and glacier change during the first symposium of the International Glaciological Society (IGS) to be held in Nepal.

When parasitic mushroom spores infect the larvae of ghost moths living in Himalayan soil, a thin fingerlike fungus bursts from the head of the dead caterpillar and sets off an annual gold rush in mountain communities.

Knowledge Forum

challenges in four major regions: the Ganges; the Nile-East Africa; the Volta-Niger; and the

Prof Bai Chunli, President of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), and an eight-member delegation visited the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD)

Knowledge Forum Lecture by Professor Walter Kaelin on Climate Change, Disasters and Displacement: The Nansen Initiative


and facilities at its Knowledge Park in Godavari. Preview copies were shared and demonstrated at a