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offer ideal conditions for hydropower, but uneven distribution of benefits can lead to friction between communities and project developers. ICIMOD set out to learn what works and doesn’t work by undertaking the first comprehensive research

region has nearly 500 GW hydropower potential, but only a fraction of it has been developed. As countries in the region gear up for increased hydropower production to alleviate energy poverty, they find themselves

region has high hydropower potential, but the changing climate and likely changes in the hydrological regime may pose a risk to future hydropower development. The changing probabilities and magnitudes of extreme events can place an additional

on ‘Benefit Sharing in Hydropower: Examples from Nepal and Implications for Other Countries in the Hindu Kush

A new environmental impact assessment is an encouraging sign for hydropower developers and environmentalists

and benefits resulting from hydropower development, an attempt to recognise the diverse

The climate, cryosphere and hydrology of the Hindu Kush Himalaya region have been changing in the past and will change in the future. Warming of the climate system is unequivocal. The atmosphere and ocean have warmed, the amounts of snow and ice

This study makes an attempt to generate database of HKH specific energy demand using both the ‘top-down’ and ‘bottom-up’ approaches and undertakes sectoral energy demand projections from 2013 to 2030

of new EIA guidelines for hydropower, carried out under the auspices of the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) in collaboration in International Finance

Project Implemented on the Ground

HKH Cryosphere Monitoring Project

Private sector discusses climate change and hydropower

I was just in time to catch my bus to work. Hurriedly, I stepped onto the bus and found a window seat open. This is a rare occurrence but many of my colleagues were on leave due to the holidays. The FM radio was playing a familiar Nepali tune loud

The Indus River Basin is shared by four countries Afghanistan, China, India, and Pakistan, with the largest portions of the basin lying in Pakistan (52%) and India (33%). The main river originates at Lake Ngangla Rinco on the Tibetan Plateau in the

Many records indicate that the trend of rising temperatures is more significant in mountain regions than adjacent lowlands. Climate models also suggest that the future will bring greater temperature increase and more erratic precipitation.

The SERVIR-Himalaya Small Grants Programme has spurred innovative ways to help decision makers do everything, from expanding banana production to monitoring forest biomass from the sky.

Wetlands in the Erhai Lake basin of Yunnan Province are a rich habitat for plants and animals and play a key role in water purification for China’s second largest highland lake.

Upper Indus Basin pilot projects 06 Oct 2016 Pilot project empowers Nepali women as agents of change 04 Oct 2016 Paper publication on the discourse of cilmate change and human mobility 01 Oct 2016 Demystifying hydrogeology at the 43rd

lessons learned from this project have been encapsulated in three publications, including policy guidelines, a training manual, project learning, and in a documentary film which hopes to help policy makers and rural development

to strengthen cooperation projects] 26 Nov 2016, Published in China News 国际山地发展中心邀中国专家加强项目合作 [Google Translation: ICIMOD invited Chinese experts to strengthen cooperation projects] 26 Nov 2016, Published