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Somewhere in a mountain village in the Himalaya, a woman folds a taro leaf into a cone, fills it with soil, and sows a seed. She waters her little cone with waste water from the kitchen, creating an enabling environment for the seed to germinate in.

river basin can improve water resource management, was the key message of the regional ‘water-livelihoods-gender nexus’, workshop 24-25 March in Kathmandu hosted by the International Centre of

is leading to water scarcity for millions of people in the growing cities of the Hindu Kush Himalayas. The massive river systems that supply the water for a range of daily needs, from drinking water to electricity generation, can’t

share knowledge on managing water resources in the Koshi River basin by integrating livelihoods and gender as core aspects

Improving the management of water resources in the Hindu Kush Himalayas means recognizing those connections and building them into policy making and development

Gender and socially inclusive local water use master plans supported by ICIMOD and HELVETAS in pilot VDCs are inspiring many communities in watershed areas to simulate the initiative

The experiences and lessons learned from this project have been encapsulated in three publications, including policy guidelines, a training manual, project learning, and in a documentary film which hopes to help policy makers and rural development

Water resources assessment and monitoring

Large cardamom (Amomum sabulatum Roxb) is the high value cash crop and main source of cash income for farmers in eastern Himalayan region including Eastern Nepal, Sikkim and parts of Darjeeling district in West Bengal of India, and Southern Bhutan.

Springs are the primary source of water for many communities living in mid-hills of Nepal. Changes in social and economic activity as well as in rainfall patterns have led to drying up of springs resulting in additional pressure on agriculture.

are the primary source of water for many communities living in mid-hills of Nepal. Changes in social and economic activity as well as in rainfall patterns have led to drying up of springs resulting in additional pressure on agriculture. Hence,

World Water Day provides us an opportunity to join our friends and colleagues from the Hindu Kush Himalayas (HKH) and the rest of the world in creating awareness about the importance of Water for human and ecosystem wellbeing towards achieving

This year’s devastating rains have brought challenges to flood-ravaged communities in Bangladesh, Nepal and northern India, particularly to sanitation. However, a flood-resilient toilet being tested in North-Western Bihar could make sanitation

Farmers from Nepal’s Sindupalanchowak and Ramechap districts attended a four-day hands-on training on water harvesting technology, bio-intensive agriculture farming system, and enclosed composting from 16 to 19 August 2017.

15. Water
of the water originates around the highest mountains on earth, a region often called “the third pole” because of its immense concentration of snow and ice, the largest outside the Arctic and Antarctic. Relying on a complex interplay of

research to develop local Water Use Master Plans (WUMP) for the Koshi Basin Programme in three districts which represent the three ecological zones of the Koshi basin —


Project Implemented on the Ground

As the recent monsoon rainfall-induced floods overran large swathes of the Nepal Terai and parts of Bangladesh and India, including Bihar, disturbing images of the havoc they wrought were flashed across news channels and information platforms.

Shot at the Rangpur pilot site in Bangladesh, the second video in the HI-AWARE Explains series looks at testing iron contamination in water.