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Sixteen Nepalese specialists in ornithology, herpetofauna, biodiversity, plants and taxono-my, fisheries, and water and environment governance participated in the workshop. Ten technical papers focusing on various aspects of ecology and its relation

pressure from climate change and rising consumption. This problem is especially acute in the Hindu Kush Himalayan mountains, which are home to 210 million people and provide water to over 1.3 billion

The Indus River Basin is shared by four countries Afghanistan, China, India, and Pakistan, with the largest portions of the basin lying in Pakistan (52%) and India (33%). The main river originates at Lake Ngangla Rinco on the Tibetan Plateau in the

vulnerable to climate change. The high peaks of the Himalayas are a vast storehouse of water in frozen form, with the world’s greatest concentration of

The Hindu Kush Himalaya (HKH) is one of the most dynamic, diverse, and complex mountain systems in the world, providing fresh water resources to more than 210 million people in the mountains and 1.3 billion people downstream.

knowledge generating and exchange institutions both within and

Silwal presented a poster on the ‘Application of CORDEX Ensemble to Simulate Climate Change Impacts on Flow Regime in the Upper Chamkhar Catchment, Bhutan’ during a session for Current and future Hydroclimate Changes.

Increasing precipitation and glacier melt keep Asia’s rivers flowing

New Studies: Indus River flow variability and trends

The Indus is one of the most meltwater-dependent rivers on earth. It hosts a large, rapidly growing population, and the world’s largest irrigation scheme. Understanding the hydrology of the upper Indus basin is challenging. The Hindu Kush,

Modelling tools determine future water availability and demand and have the potential to help planners and decision makers

In the mountains, permafrost stabilizes rock slopes, moraines and debris-covered slopes. For instance, moraines consist of loose sediment often held together by permafrost. When permafrost thaws, slopes become more vulnerable to erosion. Debris and

Somewhere in a mountain village in the Himalaya, a woman folds a taro leaf into a cone, fills it with soil, and sows a seed. She waters her little cone with waste water from the kitchen, creating an enabling environment for the seed to germinate in.

understanding of the changing climate and its impact on water resources in five of the major river basins in the region: the Indus, Brahmaputra, Ganges, Salween and

The paper, written by an international team of researchers, presents the first detailed modelling study of all glaciers in the Dudh Koshi basin in the Everest region of Nepal. This blog post aims to provide a bit of background on modelling glaciers

Methodology and progress review workshop: Land use and land cover change, Erosion and Sedimentation assessment over the Koshi River basin

Roundtable on Building Resilience to Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources of the Upper Indus Basin on 25 January 2013

Climate Change and Variability

change and variability is the main driver in the upper indus basin, particularly above timberline. At present, climate projections made for the Indus Basin exhibit coarse resolution, poor representation of major features such as monsoon and

Hosted by the International RiverFoundation, the 19th International Riversymposium (http://riversymposium.com/), which is being held at Taj Palace in New Delhi, India from 12 to 14 September 2016, brings together river managers, policy developers,