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Retreating Indigenous Bee Populations (Apis Cerana) and Livelihoods of Himalayan Farmers

have a rich tradition of beekeeping with the indigenous honeybee, Apis cerana. Over a quarter of households in these villages manage bee colonies traditionally in fixed-comb log or wall

Beekeeping is a common practice among pilot households in the Support to Rural Livelihoods and Climate change Adaptation in the Himalaya (Himalica) initiative in Taplejung, Nepal. Farmers usually keep Apis cerana Bees in traditional fixed comb log

Beekeeping with Apis cerana is a common practice among the pilot households in Taplejung district of Nepal. Over one-third of the households are engaged in this enterprise. Each household has 2–20 colonies of Bees in traditional fixed comb log and

Asiatic honeybee Apis cerana is indigenous to, among other regions, the Chittagong Hill Tracts of Bangladesh. It is found in the forests of all three of the Chittagong Hill Tracts districts: Khagrachari, Rangamati and Bandarban, and presents a

Participatory Action Research on APIS CERANA Selection and Multiplication in Nepal

training of lead farmers on beekeeping was organized from 5 -11 January 2017 with the main objective of supporting locals in Baganbari, an AdaptHimal pilot site in Bangladesh’s Chittagong Hill Tracts. The International Centre for

a team of agriculture and beekeeping specialists visited six neighbouring paras (villages) in Khagrachari district of the Chittagong Hill Tracts in Bangladesh to meet farmers who are exploring beekeeping as a means of diversifying their

News from Himalica

News - HICAP

of Nepal. Farmers catch bee swarms from the wild during the bees’ spring reproduction season. READ MORE Pilot village bee farmers from Bhutan and Nepal learn about honeybee management 25 May 2016 The International Centre for Integrated

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