Annual Report 2015: Capacity building

Financial Literacy Training Helps Households Use Remittances  to Prepare for Disaster

Increasingly in the Hindu Kush Himalayas, men are out of the villages, labouring elsewhere. So if floods come, it is mainly women who must cope. That’s the situation in flood-prone Assam, India, the site of action research in 2014–2016 on flood preparedness, and it’s also the situation in Udayapur, Nepal, where  the Assam concept was taken up in 2015–2017 in the Koshi River basin. 
At the heart of the expanding action research is a question: Will women, if provided with access to information such as financial training and extension services, be able to utilize a portion of their incomes effectively to reduce their family’s vulnerability?
The answers so far have been encouraging, and the concept has expanded into Nepal. In the Nepal work, low-income women were also provided with capacity building for livelihood diversification and disaster training, responding in part to what researchers learned about differences between local needs in Assam and Udayapur. 
Learning from India has informed the concept as it spread into Nepal, where low-income women were also provided with capacity building for livelihood diversification and disaster training. At its core, the project explores how remittances can be used by households to improve the ability to prepare and respond to disasters and their aftermath in ways that can be replicated elsewhere. The project is now being taken up in Pakistan as well.