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Every year, the people who make ICIMOD’s programmes happen in each country – from development partners to policy makers to researchers – come together to showcase their work, engage in dialogue, explore potential partnerships, and build

Climate Change continued its roll across the Himalayas in 2015 with its arrival in New Delhi, launching the Indian segment of the open-ended initiative that combines an evolving exhibition with outreach, documentation, creative expression, and

More than 120 participants from over 35 countries met in Kathmandu as part of the working group of the Climate and Clean Air Coalition to Reduce ShortLived Climate Pollutants (CCAC), a global effort to bring together governments, civil society and

Two-hundred and forty scientists from 26 countries came to Kathmandu in March to share the latest findings on glaciers and glacier change during the first symposium of the International Glaciological Society (IGS) to be held in Nepal.

The Himalayan University Consortium (HUC) brings together 33 universities from the Hindu Kush Himalayas and ten associate members from Europe and the United States, facilitating their collaboration on academic research to expand knowledge of the

Strategic Engagement with Corporate Sector Enhanced by Work with SAARC CCI

Aakash Nath Upraity

Today the group is selling allo thread at NPR 1,100 per kilogramme, an increase of NPR 300 per kilogramme (27%). The intervention addressed KLSCDI’s Nepal target output: to strengthen pro-poor and inclusive value chains addressing income

The Government of India has enlisted the expertise of ICIMOD as part of its newly launched effort to protect the complex and fragile Himalayan ecosystem

ICIMOD’s strong response to the Gorkha Earthquake was recognized in 2015 with the ESRI Humanitarian Award, which honoured ICIMOD for the quick, targeted and effective way in which its local responders and global experts were brought together to

What’s funny about air pollution? It turns out there’s a lot to laugh about – and a lot to learn – when a popular comedic duo joins forces with scientists to create a telefilm on the issue.

ICIMOD is helping communities along the route to improve sanitation, manage waste effectively, and end open defecation. Entrepreneurs are also catering more effectively to the large numbers of Indian and Nepali pilgrims who are vegetarians, learning

Villagers in Nepal are joining the space age by learning simple ways of using satellite technology to monitor the health of nearby forests and watersheds.

Solar pumps are as powerful as diesel pumps, but cleaner, less expensive, quieter, and easier to use. The operating cost, after the price of the pump itself, is essentially free. The added findings on gender equity could make them an even more

ICIMOD’s work in India to develop the value chain for tulsi made notable strides this year as farmers moved beyond basic production and enhanced their capacities in product improvement and marketing, which meant more profit for rural women.

By the end of the year, ICIMOD had repaired broken weather stations, replaced broken sensors and solar panels, and continued its scientific work by conducting surveys of surface height change of the debriscovered Langtang and Lirung glaciers.

Two transboundary initiatives in the eastern Himalayas moved ahead in 2015 with milestones that included pilot projects and the endorsement and implementation of regional cooperation frameworks (RCFs).

Mountains offer ideal conditions for hydropower, but uneven distribution of benefits can lead to friction between communities and project developers. ICIMOD set out to learn what works and doesn’t work by undertaking the first comprehensive

The SERVIR-Himalaya Small Grants Programme has spurred innovative ways to help decision makers do everything, from expanding banana production to monitoring forest biomass from the sky.

ICIMOD’s first step: Address the water problem through rooftop rainwater harvesting, new ponds, and better management. The idea proved so popular that households not involved in the pilot began building the water systems themselves.