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As a young girl growing up in the hilly Dapcha Kashikhanda municipality, Sushila Adhikari remembers her local pond Daraune Pokhari. It used to be much larger than it is today.

Springs are the primary source of water for many communities living in mid-hills of Nepal. Changes in social and economic activity as well as in rainfall patterns have led to drying up of Springs resulting in additional pressure on agriculture.

A project in Nepal’s middle hills works to address problems of water scarcity

Local community leaders from village development committees (VDCs) gathered 2 Decem-ber 2015 in Bhakunde Besi, Kavre for a one day workshop on upscaling the findings of par-ticipatory action research on springs and ponds...

of the project is to revive drying springs by building a high level of understanding of localised spring hydrogeology; extensive mapping of all spring sources in the study areas; building a comprehensive understanding of the

Reviving springs and providing access to solar powered irrigation pumps (SPIP)

Officials from Dapcha Kashikhanda Municipality in Kavre District have integrated the construction of recharge ponds into next year’s ward and VDC plans as a result of research conducted by the Nepal Water Conservation Foundation (NWCF), a partner

HI-AWARE researchers from the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD), The Mountain Institute-India and local organisations recently visited Santook Mirik on the outskirts of Kalimpong in the Teesta Basin in India to take

In 2013, ICIMOD Koshi Basin Programme (KBP) started working with the Nepal Water Conservation Foundation (NWCF) in partnership with residents from Tinpiple and Dapcha of Kavrepalanchowk District, a midhill region of Nepal, with an aim to track down

The main objective of the ToT was to enhance participants’ knowledge and skills regarding improved approaches to springwater management, and to enable them to implement springshed management approaches themselves.

Spring management

Valley and Yala Glacier this spring for routine maintenance of meteorological stations, data collection, and mass

Water is a primary life-giving resource, and its availability is an essential component in socioeconomic development and poverty reduction. The Himalayas are the source of countless perennial rivers, but paradoxically substantial number of mountain

Springs are the primary source of water for many communities living in mid-hills of Nepal. Changes in social and economic activity as well as in rainfall patterns have led to drying up of Springs resulting in additional pressure on agriculture.

Springs are the primary source of water for many communities living in mid-hills of Nepal. Changes in social and economic activity as well as in rainfall patterns have led to drying up of Springs resulting in additional pressure on agriculture.

The main objective of the ToT was to enhance participants’ knowledge and skills regarding improved approaches to springwater management, and to enable them to implement springshed management approaches themselves.

Hydrogeological investigations in Dailekh involved the study of prioritized springs where detailed hydrogeological studies and spring monitoring was carried out.

Springs are the main source of water for millions of people in the mid hills of the Hindu Kush Himalayas (HKH). Both rural and urban communities depend on Springs for meeting their drinking, domestic and agricultural water needs.

A small team of ICIMOD researchers recently returned to earthquake-ravaged Langtang Valley to rebuild and maintain the network of hydrological and meteorological stations that was partly destroyed by the 25 April Gorkha tremors...

ICIMOD ‘Springshed approach’ is an initiative to understand the hydrogeological perspective of Springs, the current demand and supply pattern, and existing local management practices, if any, at a landscape scale to use that science and