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The Koshi River basin is a transboundary basin shared by China, India, and Nepal. The river originates on the high altitude Tibetan Plateau and passes through eastern Nepal and northern Bihar in India before joining the Ganges.

in Bangladesh, Nepal and northern India, particularly to sanitation. However, a flood-resilient toilet being tested in North-Western Bihar could make sanitation safe

When parasitic mushroom spores infect the larvae of ghost moths living in Himalayan soil, a thin fingerlike fungus bursts from the head of the dead caterpillar and sets off an annual gold rush in mountain communities.

region gathered in Patna, Bihar on 4 February 2016 for a two-day forum. After years of devastating floods in southern Nepal and Bihar,

News Archive



The Hindu Kush Himalaya (HKH) is prone to natural hazards. Climate change and its impacts exacerbate this susceptibility. Floods and flash floods are major natural hazards in the HKH and are catastrophic to downstream communities. Many rivers and

Koshi basin communities can now access up-to-date information on floods

The Himalayas: Upstream but Downwind

The Koshi Basin Initiative is a collaborative and policy-relevant applied research programme to enhance the regionally coordinated management of the Koshi River basin for the improved wellbeing of local communities and the sustainable use of


Forum reveals new possibilities for water induced disaster management in the Koshi basin

Events

Timely and accurate mapping of floods is important for efficient and effective management of rescue and relief activities. It can help reduce loss and damage due to floods.

Staff Articles

In the early hours of 2 August 2014, a landslide occurred above Jure village, about 1.4 km upstream from the Sun Koshi Hydropower project’s intake site. In an instant, a 1.9 km long slope of land perched 1,350 m above the river bed collapsed,

18. Maps
Maps

Too Much or Too Little Water in the Himalayas

Speakers