Advanced Search

Search
Displaying results 1 - 20 of 129 matches (0.01 seconds)
this susceptibility. Floods and flash Floods are major natural hazards in the HKH and are catastrophic to downstream communities. Many rivers and

testing of an advanced community-based flood early warning system with telemetry (CBFEWS with telemetry) was successfully conducted at Khokhana in Kathmandu on 28 March 2017. A joint team comprising of officials from the International Centre

community-based flood early warning system (CB-FEWS) is an integrated system of tools and plans to detect and respond to flood emergencies. It’s managed by the communities themselves and, if properly designed and implemented, can make the

precipitation results in floods of various magnitudes inundating large areas of the Ganges, Brahmaputra, and Indus basins in the Hindu Kush Himalayan (HKH) region. flooding results in loss of lives and livelihoods displacing millions

water levels rise in flood-prone rivers, villagers are increasingly able to react quickly enough to save lives and livelihoods – whether they live in Assam, India, or the Koshi River basin of Nepal, or, in the latest upscaling of a successful

Workshop on Improving Flood Risk Management in Bihar was organised by the Water Resources Department (WRD) of Bihar 18-19 February in Patna with support from the World Bank. International experts on Flood forecasting, senior

By the mid-monsoon, flash floods of Bhote Koshi had already swept away more than 65 houses and placed 200 more at risk. With rains becoming heavier, further damage was expected.

Regional Hands-on Training on Community-Based Flood Early Warning Systems (CB-FEWS)

A hazard is an agent that harms or damages life, health, property, or the environment. It can be either natural or attributable to an anthropogenic activity that results in imbalances in ecological cycles and ecosystems as a whole.

Prototype of Community-Based Flood Early Warning System Installed at Godavari Knowledge Park

visited the prototype of Community-Based Flood Early Warning System (CB-FEWS) at ICIMOD Knowledge Park, Godavari on 16 April 2015. The purpose of the visit was to learn about the

and intensity of flash floods is rapidly increasing in the Himalayan region. Flash floods carrying huge amounts of water, loaded with debris and sediment, are much more hazardous and tend to affect more people than normal monsoon floods.

A field team was soon on its way, an example of the quick response to the needs of its regional member countries that ICIMOD is poised to provide. The scientific team, put together by the SERVIR-Himalaya Initiative and Cryosphere Monitoring

Mountains in the Hindu Kush Himalaya (HKH) are ‘water towers’, which provide water and services such as food, biodiversity, and energy to 1.3 billion people downstream. However, climate change is these mountains. Scientists project a likely

a framework for a regional flood information system to support disaster prevention and flood management in the HKH region, ICIMOD is working on the HKH- HYCOS project, being implemented in cooperation with WMO and funded

the fertile floodplain area of Sarpallo Village Development Committee (VDC), 270 kms east of Kathmandu, life is back to normal for local villagers in the waning days of monsoon. As a flood-prone area, Sarpallo villagers have faced summer floods

the small Bihari village in early February, we found Chharki’s streets lined with bamboo cottages topped with thatched roofs. Outside, women and children loitered. Very few men were visible. The children, most in


The training was organized by ICIMOD with technical assistance from Sustainable Eco Engineering, supported by the Governments of Norway and Sweden in India (Himalayan Climate Change Adaptation Programme) and the Australian Government through the

Flood maps illustrating village-level inundation have the potential to support BSDMA in several community-level risk reduction activities. Such information is crucial to the government’s smooth response to Flood management as waters continue to